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Bogdan Bogdanovic is headed for a complicated offseason

Both the Sacramento Kings and Bogdan Bogdanovic have some tough choices ahead of them.

As Monte McNair kicks off his tenure in Sacramento, many important decisions await him. An entirely new front office must be hired, De'Aaron Fox is eligible and deserving of a five-year max extension soon, Buddy Hield is displeased with his current role despite his expensive new contract, and Luke Walton is a floundering head coach who should probably be removed for basketball reasons, although he may be safe for financial ones. All of those, and many more choices are undoubtedly sitting somewhere on McNair's to-do list and will be resolved in the coming weeks and months, but one decision must be made sooner than almost any other: Bogdan Bogdanovic's future in Sacramento.

When Vlade Divac was in command, there was almost no doubt as to Bogdanovic's status with the organization. The team rebuffed trade offers at the deadline in February, and again touted support for Bogi back in April by committing to match any offer made in the offseason. Of course, those claims were made by folks no longer in charge, and a new man with a new plan is at the helm.

Even with Divac out of the picture, in a normal situation with a normal player entering restricted free agency with a normal roster, Bogdanovic would likely be retained. He's a talented shooting guard who raises the floor of those around him, but nothing about the current climate is normal. Bogi isn't a typical restricted free agent, nor are the Kings a typical team, nor has this been a typical season in the NBA.

Bogdanovic signed a non-rookie scale deal with Sacramento three years ago, the highest-paid rookie contract in NBA history at the time, which means he's seen some significant cash in his career. Bogi also joined the league later in life, as he recently turned 28, which is relatively unusual for a restricted free agent. He'll actually be the third-oldest RFA on the market this year, younger only than Brad Wanamaker and Torrey Craig.

In addition to Bogdanovic's personal history, there's also the disappointing nature of Sacramento's roster to take into account. In his efforts to build a playoff contender as quickly as possible, Vlade Divac assembled a bad, not very young, and very expensive group of players. The Kings already owe another shooting guard, Buddy Hield, over $80 million over the next four years, along with Harrison Barnes' remaining  three years, $60 million. Add in De'Aaron Fox's upcoming five-year, $170 million extension, plus whatever Bogdanovic will be paid in the next month or two, and things get very costly, very quickly. It'll be up to Monte McNair to build a sleeker, less expensive, more successful depth chart, and that may require sacrificing expensive or soon-to-be expensive contributors.

Adding to the seven-layer dip of complication that is this offseason is the financial state of the Kings. Almost every franchise has been severely impacted by the economical devastation of COVID-19, and Vivek Ranadive has been no exception. The team has laid off and furloughed both business and basketball operations personnel over the last few months, and relief is nowhere in sight. It's not outside the realm of possibility that the organization will be forced to make sacrifices on the court to keep things afloat off of the hardwood.

The league's status as a whole adds fogginess to an already unclear situation. From a free agent perspective, the quality of player this summer ranges somewhere between awful and putrid, and that may be putting it kindly. Bogdanovic, a solid player in his own right, would normally land in the middle tier of available targets for any given team, but the lack of talent in this class vaults him comfortably in the top-10 when the obvious options and extension are dismissed. A vacuum of starting caliber players would seem to favor Bogdanovic's camp when contemplating his potential payday, but the poor quality of his fellow free agents is quickly offset by the scarcity of cash in the open market. Very few teams were ever projected to possess cap space in the offseason, and that was before the pandemic and the possibility of a cap freeze or decrease. It's a terrible time to be a free agent in the NBA.

All of these complicated, layered factors combine to create a fascinating situation for both Monte McNair and Bogdan Bogdanovic. The two sides must negotiate against the Kings own financial and roster-based restrictions, the lack of quality players available in free agency, and the limited cap market, while also keeping in mind the team's previous offer that was made to Bogdanovic back in October. Each camp has multiple options in front of them to find the best deal for their own interests.

Internal Negotiations

At the start of the 2019-2020 season, the Kings offered Bogdanovic an extension in the range four years, $51.4 million. At the time, it seemed like an oddly specific amount, but it was the maximum the Kings could offer based off of the league's veteran extension rules, which dictate that a non-rookie scale player can sign an extension for 120% of the league average salary or 120% of the final year of the player's contract, whichever is greater. Assuming that offer is still on the table, the two sides can agree to the deal anytime prior to the end of this season, although the league remains in a transactional hiatus for the time being. There will likely be a window prior to the start of next year's free agency, but those details are currently up in the air.

If the Kings and Bogdanovic fail to come to terms on an extension, either due to a league restriction or a lack of agreement, all hope is not lost. Once the 2020-2021 season officially begins, negotiations can continue using Bogi's Bird Rights, which were earned once he completed his third season in Sacramento. Under that provision, the Kings can sign Bogdanovic to a five-year contract worth up to 25% of the salary cap, no matter how far above the cap that contract takes them, although neither the length nor the amount would be nearly that exorbitant. If Bogdanovic does return to the organization, agreeing to a new contract will likely be the most viable option, as it allows for far more flexibility than the original extension offer.

Offer Sheet

While the Kings and Bogdanovic are free to negotiate a new deal once the 2019-2020 season officially comes to a close, Bogi will not be forced to merely entertain Sacramento's offers. As a restricted free agent, he can approach or be approached by a team and sign an offer sheet. Technically, any organization with an exception or cap space can send a contract Bogi's way, although it's implausible that a team sporting only the mid-level exception, worth a maximum of $9 million, would have a chance at obtaining his services.

That leaves six teams with significant cap space as the main rivals for Sacramento to keep Bogdanovic. According to Keith Smith, here's how much cash each team will have on hand to spend, assuming the league flattens the cap threshold from last year:

Team Cap Space
Atlanta Hawks $47.8 million
New York Knicks $46.7 million
Detroit Pistons $34.3 million
Charlotte Hornets $27.2 million
Miami Heat $26.5 million
Phoenix Suns $23.6 million

Each one of those teams can offer a deal far higher than Sacramento's original extension offer, but the threat of a matched offer sheet can create an intense game of chicken between organizations. The Kings can put out the word that they'll be matching any offer for Bogdanovic, which can chase teams away for the fear of locking up their own cap space for multiple days and missing out on other, more available players, or it can even cause opposing General Managers to bid against themselves in the hopes that Sacramento won't shell out unreasonable cash for an above-average role player.

Conversely, if one of the above teams is daring enough to sign Bogdanovic to an offer sheet, the Kings will be granted 48 hours to match the exact terms of the deal, including any specific payment dates, annual salary increases or decreases, and any incentives. If the Kings choose to accept the offer, Bogi would remain in Sacramento and would automatically be granted a one-year no-trade clause. If the Kings decline to match, they'll lose one of their better, more complete players for nothing. It's important to note that once an offer sheet is formally signed, the possibility of a sign-and-trade is eliminated. McNair would have to choose between matching a contract offer or letting Bogi walk without any sort of compensation.

Qualifying Offer

Although Bogdan Bogdanovic is typically referred to as a restricted free agent when discussing his contract situation, from a purely technical standpoint, he has yet to be converted to that moniker. In order for that to occur, the Kings must first tender a qualifying offer to Bogdanovic, which is a one-year contract calculated using several factors, equaling $10.6 million for Bogdan. Once that QO is tendered, Sacramento will have offered Bogdanovic a contract prior to anyone else, granting the Kings the right of first refusal, allowing the organization to match any offer sheet this fall.

That one-year deal, while typically a formality, actually grants Bogdanovic some power in a scenario that seems to offer him none. It's entirely plausible that Monte McNair sticks close to, or even drops, Sacramento's original offer of around $13 million per year, and if Bogi doesn't find a more attractive deal from another team, he can choose to accept the qualifying offer of $10.6 million. In that situation, Bogdanovic would stick with the Kings for the 2020-2021 season, automatically be granted a no-trade clause for the entire year, and he would enter the 2021 offseason as an unrestricted free agent in a market more flush with cash, at least in theory.

Signing the qualifying offer may seem like a sensible plan for Bogdanovic if offers are somewhat disappointing, but there's a reason this option is so rarely taken. Bogi would be risking tens of millions of dollars in guaranteed income, and a poor season or significant injury could cause that cash to vanish. Typically, the wisest path for a player of Bogdanovic's age and minor injury history is to take the money sitting in front of them, rather than gambling on themselves in the hopes of gaining a few million more per year. And there is perhaps no better example of a qualifying offer backfiring than Nerlens Noel.

After the Dallas Mavericks acquired Noel at the trade deadline in 2017, he was offered a contract in the range of four years, $70 million the following summer. Noel declined the upfront cash and demanded a max deal, which Mark Cuban immediately rejected, along with pulling his original offer, forcing Noel to sign the qualifying offer for $4.2 million. Over the following two seasons, Noel's market value crashed, and he was offered just two minimum contracts from the Oklahoma City Thunder, totaling a measly $3.8 million. In all, his decision has cost him at least $45 million over the last three years. For Bogdanovic, it would probably be in his best interest to learn from Noel's mistake and sign any sort of acceptable offer this summer, whether that be from the Kings or another team.

Sign-and-Trade

One final option remains for the Kings and Bogdanovic: a sign-and-trade. While this is often touted as a way for Monte McNair to cash out on Bogi if he doesn't want to pay another shooting guard big money, the likelihood of finding a palatable partner is low at best, hence the rarity of this sort of transaction.

The easiest path to a sign-and-trade is always to find a partner with plenty of cap space, as the other team can simply absorb the new contract without having to worry about matching salaries in a deal. A good illustration of that sort of deal would be the Indiana Pacers acquisition of Malcolm Brogdon last summer. The Pacers used their cap space to take on Brogdon's deal, allowing the Milwaukee Bucks to be compensated for letting a key player walk without having to take back significant salary.

Unfortunately, only six teams will have the cap space to take on Bogdnaovic's potential deal in the coming months, and there's no guarantee that any of those organizations will want to open their wallets for Bogi, nor is there any guarantee that Bogdanovic holds any desire to join any of those teams. However, if the stars do align for all of the involved parties, the compensation headed Sacramento's way will probably be paltry at best, likely a second rounder or two or a middling player. The Kings certainly won't enjoy the return that Brogdon commanded: a 2020 first round pick, as well as a pair of second rounders.

Things will grow exponentially more complex if the Kings attempt a sign-and-trade with a franchise that cannot absorb Bogdanovic's new salary. If a non-cap space team is interested in signing Bogi, Base Year Compensation will come into play, which will greatly complicate matters. Under those rules, the team acquiring Bogdanovic will be required to send out approximately the same amount of salary as Bogdanovic, as is typically the case in a trade, but for the Kings, Bogi's outgoing salary will only account for 50% of his new deal or the final year of his previous contract, whichever is greater.

For example, if the New Orleans Pelicans thought Bogi could help with their playoff run next year and offered him a deal starting in the $15 million range, they would need to shed approximately the same amount of salary in the transaction. In this scenario, the Pelicans could send Lonzo Ball and Nicolo Melli back to Sacramento, whose salaries combine for about $15 million. However, under Base Year Compensation, Bogi's outgoing salary from Sacramento would only be counted as half of his new salary or the final year of his old contract (in this case, the latter), which would equal $8.5 million, causing a $6.5 million gap between the two teams. From there, a third team with cap space, of which there are only six in the league, would need to be compensated heavily enough to take on salary from the Kings, whether that compensation came from the Kings, the Pelicans, or both. This theory and these numbers can be applied to any team, but here's what an actual trade may look like in the given scenario:

Team Receiving Sending
New Orleans Bogdanovic ($16M) Ball ($11M), Melli ($4M)
Sacramento Ball ($11M), Melli ($4M) Bogdanovic ($8.5M), Bjelica ($7.2M)
Atlanta Bjelica ($7.2M), Compensation None

To recap, Bogdanovic would need to be interested in joining the Pelicans, the Pelicans would need to be interested in signing Bogdanovic and willing to pay him, New Orleans would need to offer the right compensation to Sacramento to convince them not to match an upcoming deal, a team with cap space would need to be found, and that team would need to be provided enough compensation to take on a contract they may not want. It's a lot of moving pieces to assemble in a very short amount of time.

A good demonstration of the required complexity of a non-cap room sign-and-trade can be found in the Jimmy Butler trade of 2019, which saw the Miami Heat, the Philadelphia 76ers, and the Portland Trail Blazers exchange multiple players, while the Los Angeles Clippers acted as the Atlanta Hawks in the example above, taking on Moe Harkless' salary in exchange for a first round pick. While such a deal can be extraordinarily difficult to pull off, Monte McNair is also the exact sort of front office executive with the experience to put together transactions of the Jimmy Butler caliber. The Kings just need the right windows to open at the right time with the right teams.

***

As the Sacramento Kings and Bogdan Bogdanovic approach perhaps the most unique free agency period in league history, their priorities will undoubtedly clash, at least to a certain extent. The Kings must prioritize positional and financial flexibility this fall, while Bogdanovic's representation will be seeking a well-defined, high-paying role with a competent, professional organization. Those contradictory goals may very well be put aside in order for the two sides to quickly agree on a new contract, or each camp may look elsewhere to fill their individual needs, although even that path may lead to eventual reunification. No matter what the final result may be, it's clear that both the Kings and Bogdan Bogdanovic are headed for an extremely complicated offseason.

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2 months ago

Wow. You’ve outdone yourself here Tim.

WizsSox
2 months ago
Reply to  Marty

Seriously…outstanding write up!

Greg
Admin
2 months ago
Reply to  Marty

Agreed. Can always count on Tim to provide detailed-yet-understandable explainations of complex cap/FA/trade sitaution.

Otis
2 months ago
Reply to  Marty

For sure, covered all the angles smartly.

MaybeNextYear
2 months ago

If I am the Kings, I am keeping that $51.4 mil offer on the table (mainly to deter Bogi from signing the qualifying offer). If he wants something better, he’ll have to go out and find it, similar to what the Rockets did with Capela a few years back.

SPTSJUNKIE
2 months ago
Reply to  BabyGiraffe

May not even need to offer that. Given the shrinking salary cap and depressed financial situation – may be best off extending an QO and letting him test the market.

Could get a cheaper or shorter term deal that gives both sides a chance to assess the fit going forward instead of tying up long-term cap space.

Kingsguru21
2 months ago
Reply to  BabyGiraffe

I agree that I would keep the extension offer on the table until the Kings have to offer the QO or Bogi hits FA, whichever deadline actually comes first. If there is indeed a deadline, in fact. I’d be surprised if the Kings were able to have both an extension offer and a QO on the table simultaneously but I’ve been surprised before. The NBA often waits on these scenarios to play out before ruling on them.

Last edited 2 months ago by Kingsguru21
PoundTheRock
2 months ago

I honestly feel like Bogdanovic is capable of so much more. I hope we do what we need to do to keep him. He’s got a high BBIQ and could be a terrific veteran for younger guys to learn under.

He’s 28, but I think he’ll be very productive for another 4-5 years.

Just my $0.02!

Also, DON’T TRADE FOX!!!

Last edited 2 months ago by PoundTheRock
Murf
2 months ago

I wonder what the Kings were offered in the deals they were offered at the trade deadline?

With a lowering cap and having Buddy on the roster at a large number, and has a potentially problematic knee My fearless guess is that they move him. I think he has value around the league and could help any number of teams.

That the Kings now have a GM who knows the league and comes from an organization that’s not afraid to make an imaginative move, to me that’s an interesting possibility

eddie41
2 months ago

I think a lot of your analysis is based on a flawed categorization of Bogi and Hield as SGs. Bogi is a combo guard because he can play pg, run an offense, and also play off the ball. Hield is a wing because he cannot handle the ball like an nba guard. There should not be a fearful suspense when watching a player bring the ball up the court. Bogi’s ability to play guard, his playmaking and his ability to play a 2-man game with bigs is valuable. Kings should keep him. He is in his prime now.

BestHyperboleEver
2 months ago
Reply to  BabyGiraffe

Ultimately, thinking multiple years down the road, I think you probably end up trading both. As I’ve mentioned before and assuming decent offers, you probably trade Buddy now and sign Bogdan to a relatively COVID-depressed deal. Then you have the chance that Bogdan’s deal is a real asset next deadline/off-season when the cap bounces back (theoretically) and teams are desperate for high value contracts to create cap space to chase the 2021 FA class.

Adamsite
Nostradumbass 14
Nostradumbass 14
2 months ago

This is where I’m at as well. Sign and keep Bogi if only for keeping him as an asset. It’s a depressed market and you should get a favorable contract because of it. Of course, this would likely mean trading Buddy, which I am totally fine with. Truth be told, if you can only keep one, I’d keep Bogi because of his better all around game.

In the end, retain Bogi on a good deal, flip Buddy for future compensation/youth. Deal with Bogi down the road.

eddie41
2 months ago
Reply to  BabyGiraffe

The problem is not having enough playmakers. Kings always do this. No playmakers = unwatchable basketball.

SMF-PDXConnection
2 months ago

Fantastic as always.

Obviously we don’t know what McNair’s vision for the Kings is yet, but based on the whole super small experiment in Houston, is there any chance they’d keep Bogi and slide him to the 3? Fox, Buddy, and Bogi with Barnes/Bagley/whoever up front? I remember Joerger toyed with that three guard lineup a bit, but I don’t know (mostly from not watching this past season) if Alton ever tried that, or what that looked like if he did try it.

After checking the three man lineup stats on NBA.com, looks like those three shared the court for 274 minutes across three games and had a -1.3 net rating per 36. So . . . I don’t know.

BestHyperboleEver
2 months ago

Of course that’s better than the team’s net rating overall. Ultimately, they didn’t play enough together. But if you do play Fox, Hield, Bogdan together a lot, what do you do for the minutes when none of them are on the court?

SMF-PDXConnection
2 months ago

I don’t know, and that’s why I’m not, nor should I be, a coach.

Something I learned to take to heart many years ago is that there are only really three things in life: there are things we know we know, things we know we don’t know, and things we don’t know we don’t know. Call me a firm believer that wisdom and understanding comes from having a lot more of the second than the third in one’s life. Unfortunately, that seems to be reversed in general these days with how many people spout off on things they clearly don’t know about.

So it goes.

RORDOG
2 months ago

It will be interesting to see how much pressure Bogi is willing to apply if he decides he doesn’t want to play here anymore. They could negotiate their deal in a way that seems reasonable from an AAV perspective, but includes signing bonuses and/or upfront base salary advances that could really hurt a team like the Kings who are currently cash strapped.

RAP87
2 months ago

Could be in the minority here but if retaining Bogi would cost more than $15 million per year then I’d say do a sign and trade. As much as possible I would like for the Kings to enter into next season with almost a clean roster (that means trading Buddy, Bogi, Holmes and Joseph) and roll with the young guys (Hard tank for 2021) and build from there moving forward. I just think retaining Bogi minimizes our chance at a potential top 5 pick next year.

BestHyperboleEver
2 months ago

TANGENT ALERT:

For those interested in trading up in the 2020 draft, the highly-respectable *cough* Bleacher Report just put up a mock draft that had the Kings trading Hield + 12 for Huerter + 6 + 50. Then they had us drafting Okongwu, which I found an odd choice that would kinda force multiple other dominos to fall. But I’m mostly focused on the trade (Note: in their draft Edwards, Ball, Wiseman, Avdija, and Toppin are the first 5 off the board. So Haliburton, Vassell, Hayes, etc. are still available).

BestHyperboleEver
2 months ago
Reply to  BabyGiraffe

Ultimately, I think the Hawks say no to that deal. I don’t really see Hield as what they need. I mean, they’d be creating the absolutely worst defensive backcourt in the NBA. That’s would be putting A LOT of defensive pressure on Hunter/Reddish and Capela just to elevate their defense to not-disastrous. But I’ve been wrong about that kind of thing before.

RAP87
2 months ago

The Kings should do that trade if it was offered to them. I liked Huerter and having a chance to draft Haliburton with the 6th pick is just too good for me to pass up. Would be interesting though if that deal would materialize, who will Mcnair chooses with the 6th pick? Killian Hayes is still available and we all know the connection he has with Dumars.

Pretty sure it would raise some questions and debate if we draft Hayes- was it a Dumars pick or was it Mcnairs?

Last edited 2 months ago by RAP87
RORDOG
2 months ago

That trade would almost certainly prevent the Hawks from becoming a participant in the Bogi sweepstakes as well. I’d be curious how Buddy would look on the Hawks though. Young is obviously a better facilitator than Fox, but the Hawks were a below average team last season based on assisted points created (23rd in the league). Maybe Young can compensate just enough for Buddy to make the pairing work on offense. I wouldn’t be surprised if he was at least more efficient due to an increase in shot quality. He would benefit from the fresh start as well.

BestHyperboleEver
2 months ago
Reply to  RORDOG

Yeah, I think Buddy’s numbers would look a bit better (more like 2018-19) but I’m not sure he would make the Hawks any better as a team. Offensively, they’re a team with one elite facilitator and a bunch of negative passers. Collins, Capela, and Hunter are absolutely zeros as passers. Honestly, in terms of passing, it looks a lot like trotting out Barnes, Bagley, Holmes/Dedmon as your front court.

NOTE: All of this reminds me of the “McNair Rule” of always looking at each trade from the other team’s POV. Currently, the Hawks are building around Young primarily, then Collins and Capela as a front court. That means, IMO they’d most likely be focused on defensive versatility and playmaking. They also have a HUGE depth problem. They scored like a top 10 offense with Young on the court and by far the worst team (by like, 17 points) in the NBA with him off.

Last edited 2 months ago by BestHyperboleEver
RORDOG
2 months ago

It also seems like a lot of the guys in that #6 range actually fit the Hawks needs better than Buddy would. The only reason I could seem them making the move is if it’s one of those things in which their trying to keep Young happy. I have no idea how close they are, but Buddy and Trae do seem to have a good relationship. Also, I know there’s been some rumblings that Young isn’t very happy with playing for a rebuilding team.

To be honest, I’d be fine with a Buddy/Huerter swap without the pick swap. The Kings would get a decent asset on a cheap contract with a few more years of team control while also cleaning up their books. I don’t think they can expect much more than that.

BestHyperboleEver
2 months ago
Reply to  RORDOG

Agreed on everything. Though recognizing that Buddy, IMO, has more market value than Huerter, I’d definitely try to extract that value. Either through the swap in 2020, or trying to get one of their 3 1sts in 2021 & 2022.

Adamsite
Nostradumbass 14
Nostradumbass 14
2 months ago

I’d be thrilled with Huerter.

BestHyperboleEver
2 months ago
Reply to  Adamsite

Me too. He has a chance to be a bigger, better playmaking Hield. Even if his defense never fully comes around.

Adamsite
Nostradumbass 14
Nostradumbass 14
2 months ago

Yup, I see a bit of a young Gordon Hayward in him. He has the ability to be a 15,5,5 guy who shoots 40% from 3. The kid also just turned 22.

If the Kings could get him in a Buddy and pick swap deal I’d be over the moon.

Kingsguru21
2 months ago
Reply to  Adamsite

Me three. Love Huerter’s potential.

eddie41
2 months ago

I like that trade and resigning Bogi. Although I might draft a different player at 6. I can’t get a good feel for Okongwu yet. Sort of a tweener

BestHyperboleEver
2 months ago
Reply to  eddie41

I like Okungwu in the right situation (MIN seems like the perfect fit), but I think a multi-year plan that includes Okungwu probably doesn’t include Holmes and Bagley. So IF you were to draft Okungwu, I’m probably trading Holmes now as I think he has some value.

Adamsite
Nostradumbass 14
Nostradumbass 14
2 months ago

Yeah, I don’t see how Okungwu and Bagley play together. It’s a bit like Holmes and Bagley going forward. I’m not excited about it.

Inthestarz
2 months ago

I hope sign and trade is an option, but IMO BOgi has no place on the Kings going forward. Kings IMO will be rebuilding with youth, and even if they weren’t I’d pick Buddy over him and BOgi IMO doesn’t have appropriate consistency to his game

Adamsite
Nostradumbass 14
Nostradumbass 14
2 months ago

This is an incredible breakdown, Tim. Well done!

anan1234
2 months ago

Looking at the list of teams with more cap space man would he look good in Miami. High BBIQ player on a high BBIQ team is a perfect match for him. I hope we can keep him though love Bogi’s game and think he’ll be productive longer then people expect.

BestHyperboleEver
2 months ago
Reply to  anan1234

Though Herro is looking like a pretty good/cheap version of Bogdan. So I’m not sure they’d want to pay more for that. But you can never have enough of those types, so maybe they would.

Adamsite
Nostradumbass 14
Nostradumbass 14
2 months ago

I think Miami is going to use that space to try and trade for Chris Paul and go all in on a title run next year…which they may even do this year. Iguodala, Olynyk and a couple of future firsts gets it done.

anan1234
2 months ago
Reply to  Adamsite

Seems like they’ll have stiff competition for Chris Paul with the rumors of Giannis wanting him. Don’t know what Milwaukee can offer but I know they will do whatever it takes to make Giannis happy.

Adamsite
Nostradumbass 14
Nostradumbass 14
2 months ago
Reply to  anan1234

I don’t how the Bucks could pull that one off. They are capped out and would have to give up most of their rotation to make salaries work.

anan1234
2 months ago
Reply to  Adamsite

Maybe a multiple team trade? Bucks are in a pickle though, should have kept Brogdan. Don’t know what they saw in Bledsoe to think he was the better option of the two.

Adamsite
Nostradumbass 14
Nostradumbass 14
2 months ago
Reply to  anan1234

I think it was cost and they underestimated what Brogdon would get on the open market. I think they wanted to retain him but also didn’t think he’d be signing a 4 year $85M deal with Indy.

Also, Bledsoe was clicking for them when he signed his extension. They also gave up a ton to get Bledsoe, so they couldn’t just let him walk in free agency.

anan1234
2 months ago

Just watched the Celtics/Heat game and you’re right Tyler Herro is all they need haha.

Kingsguru21
2 months ago

Good stuff Tim. I’ll give you props for explaining BYC. Most people don’t get how difficult that is on S&Ts when a team is over the cap. As you pointed out in how complex the Miami-Philly-PDX-Atl deal was.

But I think it works two ways. Other teams will have problems due to teams with limited cap space. Maybe there’s a couple teams out there that could facilitate a deal with a trade exception large enough… but that would eat into available room under the tax. I think the most likely scenario is that the Hawks would take a Bjelica on a 1 year remaining deal deal because they need to get to 90% of the cap. And, I doubt the Kings are the only team that would be on the Hawks radar to nab a player. Or the Hawks top choice.

But we’ll see. I think the Kings will be in a position to match a 4 year 70 million-ish deal give or take? Question is will they?

Last edited 2 months ago by Kingsguru21
Migz
2 months ago

No GM worth a damn is going into the off-season thinking “Sacramento won’t shell out unreasonable cash for an above-average role player

b-merrihew
2 months ago

I like Bogi, but I think there are a lot of teams that would pay more than the Kings offered. Bogi and Bjelica for Lonzo and Melli? I had to run to the bathroom to puke. Lonzo would make analytical GMs to hang up the phone. I think Bogi would like to play for Zion, Holiday, Ingram, and young Jaxson Hayes.
The internet says that his contract is $15 to 16M. There a few teams that have dogs with higher contracts, Bogi isn’t a dog. It will be an interesting off season.

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